Episode 52 – Ins and Outs of Influenza

 

Due to a recent outbreak, influenza and COVID-19 have been in the forefront of people’s minds. Influenza, in particular, continues to affect all age groups despite it being late in the typical season. In this podcast episode, we discuss the entire course of this disease process; from positive nasopharyngeal swab to downstream ARDS and the complex ventilator management associated with refractory hypoxemia.

Table 1

Groups at risk of influenza complications

Unvaccinated infants aged 12–24 months
Persons with asthma or other chronic pulmonary diseases such as cystic fibrosis in children or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in adults
Persons with hemodynamically significant cardiac disease
Persons who have immunosuppressive disorders or who are receiving immunosuppressive therapy HIVinfected persons
Persons with sickle-cell anemia and other hemoglobinopathies
Persons with diseases requiring long-term aspirin therapy such as rheumatoid arthritis
Persons with chronic renal dysfunction
Persons with cancer
Persons with chronic metabolic diseases such as diabetes mellitus Persons with neuromuscular disorders, seizure disorders, or cognitive dysfunction—which may compromise the handling of respiratory secretions
Adults aged>65 years
Residents of any age of nursing homes or other long-term care institutions

 

QuickVue_RSV_swab
Nasopharyngeal Swab

https://www.cdc.gov/flu/professionals/acip/background-epidemiology.htm

https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jama/article-abstract/2757578

https://www.jems.com/2019/05/13/succinylcholine-vs-rocuronium-battle-of-the-rsi-paralytics/

https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/nejmoa1214103

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4900375/

2 thoughts on “Episode 52 – Ins and Outs of Influenza

Add yours

  1. Hello,

    Great job once again. I do enjoy the casual conversation style of the podcasts.

    A shameless lug for my program.

    LifeFlight Nova Scotia has had a prone transport program for around 3 years now. Initially we proned the majority of the patients. Currently, after increased education within the local health authority the majority of patient are proned prior to transport. Thus far we have transported 11 prone patients without complication. Hopefully, we will be publishing on it in the future.

    Fear is the biggest blocker for prone positioning. For hospital staff and flight crews alike.

    All you need is some pillows and confidence.

    All the best,

    David

Leave a Reply to Heavy Lies the Helmet Cancel reply

Up ↑